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How do you fix a warped cutting board

  How do you fix a warped cutting board? It’s surprisingly easy if you’re patient. TL;DR: Your cutting board is more wet on one side vs the other. Fix it by letting the convex side dry out more. Here’s the expanded answer. First it’s important to understand why it warped in the first place. Cutting boards warp for two main reasons; they were made poorly or they weren’t being cared for properly. Since most cutting boards are made well, let's focus on proper care and what causes it to warp. After using or washing a cutting board it’s normal for it to be wet—this is the critical time when a cutting board will warp. If one side of the cutting...

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How to Restore Wooden Kitchen Utensils: Step By Step Guide

Intro: How do you restore wooden kitchen utensils? Roughly the same way you would restore other wooden products. The kitchen is a particularly rough environment for wooden products—they are consistently abused with heat, water, and use. The most common sufferers of degradation is the wooden cuttingboard, spatula, and spoon. For the past few months I have been mistreating one of our Bird's Eye Maple spatulas in my kitchen. I use it for cooking, scraping during cleanup, and have regularly let it sit in water for days at a time. See Image below: The spatula on the left is new, the spatula on the right has been worn out and lost its luster.   Step 1: First thing is to gather...

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Mineral Oil vs Flaxseed Oil

  Mineral oil is an extremely popular and common wood finish. It’s popularity is largely due to its cheap price, lack of caustic smell, and ease of use. It makes for an easy to use product that generally performs well. Mineral oil simply soaks into the woods surface and fills pores, which prevents absorption of food odors, eases cleaning, and maintains wood integrity. It also provides a pleasant luster, and unlike varnish it does not create a protective coating over the wood that is not safe for food products. Mineral oil is a byproduct of refining crude oil into gasoline. There are varying grades of mineral oil. The lesser refined mineral oil is a grade 1 carcinogen, meaning it is...

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What causes Bird’s Eye Maple

Today it seems like we are just a google search away from the answer to anything. This is simply not true. Even seemingly ordinary things can perplex scientists for years. Take Bird’s Eye wood grain for example. It’s a type of wood grain that has been found in only a few tree species including White Ash, Cuban Mahogany, American Beech, Black Walnut, Huon Pine, Yellow Birch, and Hard Maple. However Bird’s eye grain forms most commonly in Maple that grows in the great lakes area of North America but also appears in the Rocky Mountains. Interestingly, Huon Pine Bird’s eye is found only in Tasmania. Researchers still do not know the exact cause of this phenomenon that happens in only...

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